Treatment Center for Drug Dependents

Drug Treatment Programs

Residential, Outpatient Extended Care



If you or your loved one is in need of alcohol rehab or drug rehab, we are glad you found UMEED CLINIC. We are here to assist you in finding the treatment program to best fit the needs of you or your loved one. UMEED Treatment Centers offer a personalized drug rehab experience, so while we outline our 'base' addiction treatment and drug rehabiliation programs, we do not present a 'one-size-fits-all' solution, because we are not a 'one-size-fits-all' treatment center. We offer a number of solutions, all of which can be tailored to fit specific needs and circumstances.

When an individual chooses UMEED CLINIC, our goal is to directly address the disease of alcoholism and/or drug addiction. Our approach involves professional addiction treatment such as cognitive-behavior therapy, family therapy, support groups, and other individual counseling services. It also includes other activities designed to strengthen the mind, body and spirit. Our experience has shown when traditional therapies are combined with specialized treatments, the result is an increase in individuals achieving and maintaining sobriety

Treatment approaches to Drug Addiction

Principles of Effective Treatment

Scientific research since the mid–1970s shows that treatment can help patients addicted to drugs stop using, avoid relapse, and successfully recover their lives. Based on this research, key principles have emerged that should form the basis of any effective treatment programs:

  • Addiction is a complex but treatable disease that affects brain function and behavior.
  • No single treatment is appropriate for everyone.
  • Treatment needs to be readily available.
  • Effective treatment attends to multiple needs of the individual, not just his or her drug abuse.
  • Remaining in treatment for an adequate period of time is critical.
  • Counseling—individual and/or group—and other behavioral therapies are the most commonly used forms of drug abuse treatment.
  • Medications are an important element of treatment for many patients, especially when combined with counseling and other behavioral therapies.
  • An individual's treatment and services plan must be assessed continually and modified as necessary to ensure that it meets his or her changing needs.
  • Many drug–addicted individuals also have other mental disorders.
  • Medically assisted detoxification is only the first stage of addiction treatment and by itself does little to change long–term drug abuse.
  • Treatment does not need to be voluntary to be effective.
  • Drug use during treatment must be monitored continuously, as lapses during treatment do occur.
  • Treatment programs should assess patients for the presence of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, tuberculosis, and other infectious diseases as well as provide targeted risk–reduction counseling to help patients modify or change behaviors that place them at risk of contracting or spreading infectious diseases.

Effective Treatment Approaches

Medication and behavioral therapy, especially when combined, are important elements of an overall therapeutic process that often begins with detoxification, followed by treatment and relapse prevention. Easing withdrawal symptoms can be important in the initiation of treatment; preventing relapse is necessary for maintaining its effects. And sometimes, as with other chronic conditions, episodes of relapse may require a return to prior treatment components. A continuum of care that includes a customized treatment regimen—addressing all aspects of an individual's life, including medical and mental health services—and follow–up options (e.g., community – or family-based recovery support systems) can be crucial to a person's success in achieving and maintaining a drug–free lifestyle.

Dr.Muhammad Amjad Chaudhry

Project Director & Consultant Psychiatrist

  • MBBS-DPP(UK).
  • International associates of Royal College of Psychiaty (UK).
  • Member of World Psychiatric Association rural health since 2008 to 2011.
  • International Member American Psychiatrists Association(APA)(USA)
  • International Member American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP)(USA)
  • Certified Buprinorphine Prescription Psychiatrist in Opioid dependence(AAAP-USA)
  • Lecturer in Drug addiction.

News Section

Read current medical research articles on drug addition including nicotine, prescription drugs and illegal drugs. Find out about addiction treatment.
  • An alternative to medical marijuana for pain?
    Medical marijuana is proliferating across the country due to the ability of cannabis ingestion to treat important clinical problems such as chronic pain. However, negative side effects and the development of tolerance limit the widespread therapeutic use of THC, the major psychoactive ingredient in cannabis. THC's side effects are produced via its actions at cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the brain. Thus, scientists theorized that an agent with similar mechanistic actions, but that activate CB2 receptors instead, may eliminate the unwanted side effects while maintaining an equivalent level of efficacy.
  • Bans don't help smokers quit, researchers say
    No significant change in home habits of smokers have been observed in the aftermath of a ban on smoking in public spaces, researchers report. Greater inspiration to kick the habit likely comes from having friends or family who set an example by giving up cigarettes themselves, the authors write.
  • Educating college students on drinking risks can help lessen drinking behaviors, but only temporarily, study...
    Briefly counseling college students on the dangers of binge drinking is effective in lowering heavy drinking levels among many students, but only temporarily. Three out of four will be right back where they started a year later, according to new research.
  • The more friends you drink with ... the more you drink
    Alcohol consumption of individuals appears to increase with the number of friends in their drinking group. A new study used internet-based questionnaires that study participants completed on their own smartphones to survey almost 200 young adult drinkers in Switzerland every hour while they were drinking in real-life situations, asking them to report the number of friends present and number of drinks they had consumed.